RSS Feed

Why haven’t you got a blog?

The amount of twitter handles for wannabe journos I’ve seen recently without links to a website/blog has sparked off this post.

Why don’t you have a blog? Why don’t you have a website?

These things are not an option for aspiring journalists, they are a necessity.

Why you need a blog

– Writing like a journalist takes practice. A lot of practice. Your blog is the perfect way to do this: treat it as a learning project, look back on your first post in a month or two and see how you’ve improved. If people are reading it you get a bigger incentive to write, so you’re more likely to keep it up – it’s the same buzz you get when seeing your name in print

– It’s really fun. Take advantage of the fact that you are in control, you can write about whatever you want and know it’s not going to get cut to shreds by a sub-editor. Enjoy it while you can

– Remember that thing I wrote about being a PR person and creating your brand? Your blog is an essential part of that brand

Forget – ‘I’ll sort it out when I’ve finished studying’ – you need to do it now. When you are applying for jobs if you have only just started your blog, the employer will know and you’ll look far less determined and credible than that other applicant who’s blogged their way through university. No guesses for who’s going to get an interview and who isn’t.

How to start a blog

–        WordPress is a great platform as is tumblr, they are very self explanatory and easy to use. Go to the help pages if you get stuck

–        Chose a main focus. Pick one thing to write about that you enjoy and that you can get plenty of material from. Make it useful for your readers, writing about what you got up to with your friends isn’t going to be very entertaining for anyone other than you or your friends. Do you have specialist knowledge about something? Write about that. Or make it entertaining: what do you have a lot to say about? If you are going to write about people, they don’t have to be famous – is your mum funny? I really want to start a blog about my mum (she’s a character to say the least)

–        Keep at it. You don’t have to write lengthy entries every day, mix it up with videos, photos, long posts and short posts but most importantly keep it going.  You can also schedule your posts, write a few when you’ve got time and save them to be released once a day or a few times a week

–        Interact. Follow other bloggers and leave comments on their posts which link back to your own blog. Follow people on twitter who might be interested in what you are writing about. My twitter handle says this: Are you a wannabe journo? Read my blog https://rhianjournojones.wordpress.com/ and I spend a bit of time every night finding wannabe journos to follow on twitter, who then usually follow me back and read my blog

–        Promote your blog through Twitter, Facebook, your website (because you do have one..don’t you..?) and LinkedIn. Make sure the link is very clearly displayed on all of your online signatures. No one should ever have to ask you if you’ve got one or how to find it

I’ve come into contact with quite a few editors and journalists over the last few months, and after telling them how I’ll be looking for a job when my apprenticeship ends the one thing they all have asked me is: have you got a blog? At the time I didn’t have a proper one. So I quickly pulled my finger out and started one.

Please do the same.

Advertisements

About Rhian Jones

I am a freelance music business journalist based in London. My career began when I saw an apprenticeship with freelance education journalist Janet Murray advertised in the Guardian. I applied, and after a gruelling two-day Alan Sugar style assessment, got the job, quit university and relocated to London to pursue my dream of a career in the media. The apprenticeship ended on a high when I secured my first journalism job at Music Week. I spent my week days writing news stories, interviewing and learning all about the fast paced nature of putting together a weekly magazine, all while gaining invaluable insight into the inner workings of the music business. After three years and a few promotions, I left my position as news editor to go freelance in 2015. Alongside two regular gigs as London correspondent for US trade rag Hits, and contributing editor for Music Business Worldwide, I've written for publications including Company, Grazia, The Sunday Telegraph, the Guardian, The Independent, Music Ally, Billboard, The Journalist and Music Teacher.

3 responses »

  1. Jackie Paulson

    Wonderful read today: I blog because I want to, because I like to share information or photo’s with others. I have a free contest to win a book wedge I do hope you stop by.

    Reply
  2. Hi there, I just read your post and it really helped me to get back on my feet. I’m a first year journalism student at UCA and I found your blog through your twitter (which I follow). I just wanted to thank you for your advice.

    Reply
  3. Thank you Mariana, glad to have helped – that’s what it’s there for! Keep following, there will be much more to come.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: